The below Connecticut statute creates two avenues for Connecticut state employees to receive disability benefits. The first is, if you became disabled before you turned 65 and you have ten years of service for the state. The statute provides that your disability can stem from a non-work related incident. The second avenue is for people with less than ten years of service. You can only collect if your disability originates from an injury received while performing your job. If you are eligible for benefits, your monthly payments may be reduced due to receipt of worker’s compensation, social security disability, or income you generate while you are disabled. Contact us if you are in the process of applying for benefits or you are considering applying in the future. 

Sec. 5-192p. Disability retirement. (a) If a member of tier II, while in state service, becomes disabled as defined in subsection (b) of this section, prior to age sixty-five, he is eligible for disability retirement if the member has completed at least ten years of vested service. If a member of tier II, while in state service, becomes so disabled as a result of any injury received while in the performance of his duty as a state employee, he is eligible for disability retirement, regardless of his period of state service or his age.

(b) A member is disabled for the first twenty-four months if he is permanently unable to continue to render the service in which he has been employed. Disability retirement continues thereafter only if such member is totally disabled for any suitable and comparable job.

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